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How we made #OpenIndia

Ankur N's picture

Cross posted from the End Poverty in South Asia blog

open india

It has been a season ripe with new ideas and shifts in the open data conversation. At the Cartagena Data Festival in April, the call for a country-led data revolution was loud and clear. Later in June at the 3rd International Open Data Conference in Ottawa there was an emphasis on the use of open data-beyond mere publishing.

Mulling on these takeaways, a logical question to ask may be: what would a country-focused data project that aims to put data to use look like?

How long does it take to start a business in your country?

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français | Español | 中文
One of the most interesting trends in Doing Business is the reduction in the number of days it takes to start a business across the world. Navigate through the graphic below using the arrows next to the captions and then select any countries or groupings you'd like to see with the dropdown menu at the bottom.
 
 

Starting a business gets easier around the world

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: Español

On average, it took 20 days to start a business in 2015 vs 51 in 2003. The 2016 edition of Doing Business finds that low and middle income countries are making big strides in improving business climates. Notably, a total of 45 economies, 33 of which were developing economies, undertook reforms to make it easier for entrepreneurs to start a business. The report presents quantitative data on 189 economies, including many city-level analyses. You can download the report and the data behind it from the Doing Business website.

17 statistics for World Statistics Day (and why we need to invest in them)

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: 中文
Standard_deviation_diagram.svg.png

Today’s celebration of World Statistics Day comes right after Sunday’s International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, last month’s UN General Assembly agreeing the Sustainable Development Goals and the launch of the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data.  

A common thread? Better data leads to better lives.

World Statistics Day celebrates the role of statistics, the institutions and individuals that produce them, and the impact they have in designing and monitoring the policies and services that can improve people’s wellbeing.

The World Bank’s commitment to improve statistics and fill data gaps

 



There are some big gaps in country-level data - gaps in what we know. We consider this “data deprivation”  an overlooked dimension of poverty. That’s why we’re working with our partners to identify priority investments to close these gaps.

The areas we’ll initially focus on include: ensuring universal civil registration of births and deaths; improving economic statistics; expanding the coverage of household surveys in the world’s poorest countries; and taking advantage of new technologies and data sources to improve data production and use.  

Statistics are vital. We’re working to make them better, so they can be used better.

So without further ado, my colleages around the Bank have put together 17 statistics that stand out for them  - some you may know, some you may not, all of them related to the Sustainable Development Goals:

Chart: only half of countries have reliable poverty data

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية | Español

Only half of the countries in a recent World Bank study had two or more poverty data points in the 10 year period from 2002 - 2011. To meet the need for reliable data, the World Bank’s new initiative will step up efforts to collect data in the poorest countries. 

 

How do you access data on poverty?

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français | Español

End Poverty Day tomorrow comes among heightened discussion about poverty’s causes, its measurement and what we can do to end it.   

The international extreme poverty line has been updated to $1.90/day, the recent Global Monitoring Report projects that the number of people living below this line will fall below 10% this year, and the Bank has just announced it’s stepping up efforts to boost data collection in the poorest countries, many of which suffer from “data deprivation”.

New Poverty Data Widget

These headlines are great, but how do you actually get to the data? If you want to quickly find how many people live below the international poverty line in a given country, you can use and embed this new widget that’s connected to the World Bank’s PovCalNet database:


4 more ways of accessing poverty data

Here are some other tools I find useful for accessing poverty data:

Chart: the world's working-age population has peaked

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية | Español

The share of the global population that is working-age has peaked at 66% and is now on the decline. The share of the elderly is anticipated to almost double to 6% by 2050, while the global count of children is stabilizing at 2 billion.  Read more.
 

Data Lab Link Roundup: $1.90/day, haunted by big data, probability by profession, Bokeh, years left to live, and the statistical life of Martians

Tariq Khokhar's picture



Here are some things that recently caught our attention:

   
  • Like me, David Evans is a fan of “The Martian” - Andy Weir’s hit novel that’s just received the hollywood treatment. In the story, hundreds of millions are spent trying to bring astronaut Mark Watney home from Mars. David quotes Richard Thaler who notes  “we rarely allow any identified life to be extinguished solely for the lack of money. But of course thousands of “unidentified” people die every day for lack of simple things like mosquito nets, vaccines, or clean water.” More on why the difference between an “identified life” and a “statistical life” matters.

 

Record number of forcibly displaced people has reached 60 million worldwide, data show

Leila Rafei's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français | 中文 | Español

As we continue to see headlines and editorials almost every day about migrants and refugees, it's not surprising when UNHCR reports that the number of forcibly displaced people has reached 60 million worldwide for the first time since World War II. This figure includes internally displaced people, refugees, and asylum seekers.

While many are on the move as refugees, others migrate willfully at rates that have also reached unprecedented levels. Below, I've explored some trends in regional, country- and economic-level migration and refugee data. But first: What's the difference between a migrant and a refugee?

According to UNHCR, a refugee is any person who has been forced to flee their country of origin because of a fear of persecution. A migrant, on the other hand, is one who leaves their country voluntarily for reasons such as employment, study, or family reunification. A migrant is still protected by their own government while abroad, while a refugee lacks protection from their country of origin.

Data Lab Link Roundup: Statistics for hackers, the Moebio framework, data podcasts and a new proof of the Pythagorean theorem

Tariq Khokhar's picture


Here are some things that caught our attention last week:

   
  • “If you can write a for-loop you can do statistical analysis” says Jake Vanderplas in his fine presentation on “Statistics for Hackers”. While there are a lot of “statistics for x kind of person” tutorials, I like this one for using fairly intuitive computation approaches.

 

 

 
  • On a sad note, Jake Brewer died suddenly this weekend. A model public servant,  he was a huge believer in the power of civic technology to improve people’s lives, and I count myself among the thousands of people inspired by his work and thinking.

 

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