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Chart: People in Fragile States Receive Higher Average Remittances

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: 中文 | Français | Español

Remittances – money sent back home by emigres – amount to a larger financial flow than development aid. Since 2000, remittance inflows per capita to fragile states have been higher than those to other developing countries.

Read more in the OECD's States of Fragility 2015 and access data on migration and remittances and data on population and remittances from World Development Indicators. Note the aggregations and data used in the chart above are made available by the OECD at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/888933185242

Development community rallies on migration and refugee crisis: Upcoming events from the International Organization for Migration, World Bank

Leila Rafei's picture

Recently, I wrote a blog highlighting the latest data trends in refugees and migration data as the global crisis reached unprecedented levels. It’s now two months later and refugee flows continue to swell. In October alone, reports the UNHCR, the total number of refugees reaching Europe matched the total for the entirety of 2014.
 
This week two pertinent conferences will be held by the World Bank and the International Organization for Migration to address the pressing issues surrounding this crisis. First, on December 9 the World Bank and the EU Presidency of Luxembourg held the “Conference on Migration and the Global Development Agenda” at the World Bank Headquarters in Washington, DC. Speakers discussed maximizing benefits and minimizing risks of migration for migrants and host, transit and origin countries. The event was open to the public and was livestreamed

Untangling the Syrian Refugee Crisis with Open Data

Leila Rafei's picture
Also available in: Español | Français | العربية

Refugees, asylum seekers, migrants and the internally displaced. For Syrians and journalists, these are the buzzwords of the moment, but I’ve been curious: are there data that can help to understand the issue better? Since I work in the department in the World Bank responsible for leading the Open Data Initiative, I thought I’d see whether there are open data resources that can help with that.

Each of the terms above describes a different way in which humans move, and all are difficult to measure. In Syria, as a result of the internal conflict, all are in evidence. Refugees need to move in order to preserve their lives or political freedom. Asylum seekers have applied for official refugee status, but haven’t received it yet. International migrants move from one country to another - generally for economic opportunity, but also if they are refugees. The internally displaced are people who have fled their homes but still reside within the borders of their original country.