Call for Papers: Institutional Frameworks for Addressing Migratory Movements in Context of Environmental Change

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Background
 
Experts agree that the institutional frameworks for addressing migration, displacement and relocation in the context of environmental change are not well articulated. There is overall a lack of understanding of good practices in planned relocations and preventive resettlement. Moreover, most of the experiences studied so far have proved quite negative. Appropriate governance responses need to distinguish between rapid- and slow-onset events and take into account the socio-economic and demographic characteristics of the community involved. There is also need for institutional frameworks capable of providing support to those who are not able or willing to leave the affected region and, therefore, remain behind. A symposium organized by KNOMAD’s Thematic Working Group (TWG) on Environmental Change and Migration in 2014 concluded: “a mapping exercise that identifies effective mechanisms for cooperation and coordination among different ministries and agencies would provide guidance to governments and international organizations as they move ahead in developing adaptation strategies involving human mobility.”
 
Call for Proposals
 
The TWG on Environmental Change and Migration plans to commission one or more papers that improve understanding of existing and new institutional frameworks addressing internal and international migration in the context of environmental change. The papers will be distributed widely, including for circulation at upcoming events such as the Conference of Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Global Forum on Migration and Development, and the World Humanitarian Summit.

We are seeking proposals for preparation of papers that address one or more of the following issues:
 

  • A critical review of the literature and mapping of global, national, and regional institutional frameworks in the context of environmental change;
  • Analysis of the efficacy of existing institutional frameworks designed to address rapid-onset environmental change as a driver of migration in one or more developing regions (based on already collected empirical data);
  • Analysis of the efficacy of existing institutional frameworks designed to address slow-onset environmental change as a driver of migration in one or more developing regions (based on already collected empirical data);
  • Analysis of the impact of existing frameworks such as the National Adaptation Plans, Poverty Reduction Strategies Papers, and Disaster Risk Reduction strategies to identify potential improvements in planning for migration, displacement, and planned relocation; and
  • Discussion on whether new forms of governance are needed to address migration and displacement in the context of environmental change.
 
Completed papers should be between 7,500-10,000 words including an Executive Summary and Bibliography. The paper should be in English, using language that is accessible to policymakers and practitioners as well as researchers.
 
Proposal Format and Timelines
 
Proposals should be no more than 3-4 pages, single spaced. They should provide a brief summary of the paper to be produced under the consultancy, an outline of the paper’s contents and a short bibliography. The proposal must also indicate that the consultant will be able to meet the TWG’s deadlines for these papers:
 
Draft paper: May 15, 2015
Final paper: June 30, 2015
 
Please note that the consultancy will not support new research. As stated above, proposed analyses should be based on already collected empirical data. Proposals should also include CVs of the principal authors.
 
Honoraria
 
An honorarium of $2,500 will be offered to those invited to prepare papers.
 
Please submit proposals no later than March 15, 2015 to
 
Susan Martin, Chair of KNOMAD’s TWG on Environmental Change and Migration  at [email protected]
 
Hanspeter Wyss, Focal Point for the TWG on Environmental Change and Migration, KNOMAD Secretariat at [email protected]

Authors

Susan Martin

Director, Institute for the Study of International Migration, School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

Hanspeter Wyss

Senior Program Officer, DECIG/KNOMAD, World Bank