Syndicate content

Transforming Global Remittances with Distributed Ledger Technology and Interledger Protocol

Dilip Rao's picture
While many humanitarian issues need to be addressed with respect to international migrants and refugees, the cost of global remittances, which may support entire families in low and middle income countries, continues to be a topic of debate. According to the latest Knomad Migration & Development Brief, the global average cost of sending $200 was 7.1% in the first quarter of 2018 ($14.20 per payment).

Planned Relocations: Learning from Latin American Experiences

Elizabeth Ferris's picture
When landslides destroy communities or sea levels rise how do governments move people out of harm’s way?  “Planned relocations” is the term being used to describe the process of moving people in order to protect them from disasters or from the effects of environmental change.

Migration and remittances can speed up Asia’s development. Here’s how

Mayumi Ozaki's picture
Globally, an estimated 266 million people live and work outside their countries of origin (Source: Migration and Development Brief 29) to seek opportunities provided by economic globalization. About one-third of them are from Asia and the Pacific.

Asian migrant workers tend to be semi- or low-skilled. They usually migrate to countries such as the US, high-income OECD countries, the Middle East, or middle- or upper-income countries within the region. 
 

The Global Compact on Migration from a development perspective – views from a Meeting of Experts

Dilip Ratha's picture
This week, the fourth round of negotiations for the Global Compact on Migration (GCM) is taking place in New York. These negotiations will lead up to the intergovernmental conference to be held in December 2018 in Morocco. As a contribution to this process of negotiations, in mid-2017, KNOMAD organized an invitation-only Experts Meeting.

Record high remittances to low- and middle-income countries in 2017

Dilip Ratha's picture
The World Bank’s latest Migration and Development Brief shows that officially recorded remittances to developing countries touched a new record—$466 billion in 2017, up 8.5 percent over 2016. The countries that saw the highest inflow in remittances were India with $69 billion, followed by China ($64 billion), the Philippines ($33 billion), Mexico ($31 billion), Nigeria ($22 billion), and Egypt ($20 billion).

Global Compact on Migration

Mahmoud Mohieldin's picture
The Global Compact on Migration (GCM) – a global agreement being negotiated by over 200 countries –can promote safe, orderly and regular migration, but first it will need to address a number of challenges to non-migrants. These include maintaining national identity in the face of large immigration flows, perceived (and actual) job competition impacting native workers in host countries, and the difficulties faced by family members of migrants who are left behind in the country of origin.

Limitations of Cash Payment Limitations

Nikos Passas's picture
Back in March 2017, the European Union Commission announced a public consultation about a possible introduction of cash payment limitations (CPL). This follows the adoption of an action plan dated 2.2.2016 “against the financing of terrorism”. This action plan suggests that because “payments in cash are widely used in the financing of terrorist activities” we should explore “the relevance of potential upper limits to cash payments”.

Technology and market developments in the remittance industry

Supriyo De's picture
There are currently two notable but divergent trends in the global remittance industry: market consolidation by large players and the disruption potential of small technology driven startups. The former could retard attempts to reduce remittance costs while the latter could accelerate cost reduction. Reducing remittance costs are an important development objective mandated by the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

KNOMAD releases survey data on recruitment costs for low-skilled migrant workers

Petra Niedermayerova's picture
The movement of workers across state borders has become highly commercialized in many parts of the world. The recruitment process often involves third-party intermediaries charging high fees, which frequently burdens migrants in the lowest-paying jobs.

Pages