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Climate-Smart infrastructure

In the line of fire: lessons from a California architect on rebuilding resiliently

Sunny Kaplan's picture


Photo: Tony Salas | Flickr Creative Commons

In my home state of California in the United States, major drought-fueled wildfires tore across the state in the latter half of 2017 setting records for both the state’s deadliest fire, as well as the largest fire. Wildfire season is back in 2018 with the most destructive year ever—currently more than 13,000 firefighters are battling 9 large blazes that have damaged or destroyed over 2,000 homes or buildings and scorched over 730,000 acres of land.
 
The Mendocino Complex fire in Northern California recently broke the state’s previous record for largest fire, spreading furiously due to heat, wind, and years of drought. 

California’s Governor Jerry Brown said this is becoming the new normal…where fires threaten people’s lives, property, neighborhoods and, of course, billions and billions of dollars. Many point to climate change as the driver for weather conditions fueling most of the wildfires. July was the hottest on record for the state, and extreme weather is causing larger and more destructive fires across the whole western United States.

Under this “new normal” how do designers and city planners even begin to rebuild quality infrastructure affordably, resiliently, and sustainably?

Alavancar as PPP em Moçambique para aumentar à conservação e promover o desenvolvimento económico

Elisson Wright's picture


THPStock | Shutterstock

Ao longo das últimas décadas, as Parcerias Público Privadas (PPP) têm sido utilizadas para criar transporte, energia, telecomunicação e diversas outras infraestructuras em todo o mundo. Cadeias de valor foram estabelecidas para fomentar o crescimento nesses sectores e criar experiências significativas. Um sector amplamente ignorado para fins de investimentos em PPP é o sector do turismo.

Em 2016, viagens e turismo movimentaram USD 7,6 biliões (10,2% do produto interno bruto global) e geraram cerca de 292 milhões de empregos em todo o mundo. O sector do turismo é também aquele que mais contribui para financiar áreas protegidas, como por exemplo os parques nacionais.

Leveraging PPPs in Mozambique to scale conservation and promote economic development

Elisson Wright's picture


THPStock | Shutterstock

Over the last few decades, Public-Private-Partnerships (PPPs) have been used to build transportation, energy, telecommunications, and other infrastructure throughout the world. Value chains were established to foster growth in these sectors and significant experiences gained. A sector largely overlooked for PPP investments is the tourism sector.

In 2016, travel and tourism generated $7.6 trillion (10.2 percent of global gross domestic product) and an estimated 292 million jobs globally. The tourism sector is also the largest market-based contributor to finance protected areas such as national parks. In some countries, tourism depends almost exclusively on natural systems, often with wildlife as the primary attraction.

An optimist’s view on climate-smart infrastructure

Vasuki Shastry's picture


Photo: RoyBuri | Pixabay

In developed countries, we tend to take infrastructure services for granted. It’s easy to forget, when living in London, Washington, or Singapore, how much lies behind the simple act of switching on the lights. But as a young person growing up in India in the 1960s, I knew what it was like to live with rampant electricity shortages and terrible roads. It was easy to complain about it, and we did. It seemed, then, that the solution was simple: government should simply cough up the money, get to work, and build the infrastructure.
 
But there was a lot more we didn’t think about. Behind good infrastructure systems lie much more than concrete, pipes and wires. There are other building blocks as well, such as sound policy, good regulations, viable institutions, and fruitful interactions between the public and private sectors.