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Infrastructure & Africa’s development—the PPP imperative

Fida Rana's picture


Photo: CIFOR | Flickr Creative Commons 

Africa is a continent rich in natural resources and boasts a large young, ambitious, and entrepreneurial-minded population. Harnessed properly, these endowments and advantages could usher in a period of sustained economic growth and increased well-being for all Africans.
 
However, a lack of modern infrastructure is a major challenge to Africa’s economic development and constitutes a significant impediment to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.
 
According to a recent report by the World Bank, there are varying trends in Africa’s infrastructure performance across key sectors and regions. In telecommunications, Sub-Saharan Africa has seen a dramatic improvement in the quantity and quality of infrastructure, and the gains are broad-based. Access to safe water has also risen, with 77% of the population having access to water in 2015, from 51% in 1990. In the power sector, by contrast, the region’s electricity-generating capacity has changed little in more than 20 years. At about 0.04 megawatts per 1,000 people, capacity is less than one-third of that of South Asia, and less than one-tenth of that of Latin America and the Caribbean.

How Managed Equipment Services in Kenya help the private sector contribute to healthcare

Cynthia Olotch's picture


Photo: DFID | Flickr Creative Commons

Health is one of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). However, it is not feasible for any country, rich or poor, to provide its entire population with all needed health services. Accordingly, the private sector has an important role to play in closing the healthcare gap, as it contributes financial resources, innovation, and expertise.

The managed equipment services (MES) arrangement, used in Kenya, is one way to do this. MES is a business model emerging in Kenya’s healthcare system involving partnerships between the private sector and public healthcare providers that offers solutions to some of the challenges posed by the dynamic healthcare industry.
 

Transforming Kenya’s healthcare system: a PPP success story

Monish Patolawala's picture


Photo: Direct Relief, Flicker Creative Commons

The Kenyan government launched its national long-term development plan, Vision 2030, in 2008 with the aim of transforming Kenya into a newly-industrialised, middle-income country providing a high quality of life to all citizens by 2030, in a clean and secure environment.

Constructed around three key pillars – economic, social and political – the blueprint has been designed to address all aspects of the country’s infrastructure and economy, with a key component of the social pillar consisting of ambitious healthcare reforms. Ultimately, the government’s goal is to ensure continuous improvement of health systems and to expand access to quality and affordable healthcare to tackle the high incidence of non-communicable diseases that affect the region.

Success factors in Turkey’s Elaziğ healthcare PPP

Matthew Jordan-Tank's picture

Editor's Note: Join us April 22nd at 10AM ET for the 2017 Global Infrastructure Forum when the Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs), the United Nations, the G-20, and development partners from around the world meet to discuss opportunities to harness public and private resources to improve infrastructure worldwide, and to ensure that investments are environmentally, social and economically sustainable. Check out the event site to view the livestream on April 22.



Imagine the difficulty of designing, financing, building and operating a €360 million, 1,000-bed hospital campus that serves a region of 1.6 million people? This is exactly what the government of Turkey is doing in Elaziğ, a city of 350,000 in eastern Anatolia. The facility will serve and accommodate about 20,000 patients and their relatives per day with a broad range of services including women and children’s health, psychiatric services, and a dental clinic.
 
A project of this size is bound to be challenging and complex. But the approach taken by the Turkish Government has been a success—to involve a private-sector partner through a public-private partnership (PPP) with support from multilateral development banks. How did they do it?

In India, a hospital that’s just what the doctor ordered

Pankaj Sinha's picture



The Indian State of Bihar, by population, is larger than the Philippines. Or, if you prefer, by the number of residents, Bihar would be the 13th largest country in the world. Yet Bihar’s health indicators are consistently worse than India’s average. And despite accounting for nearly 9% of India’s population, not a single specialty health facility in Bihar is among the nearly 340 Indian hospitals accredited by the National Accreditation Board of Hospitals & Healthcare Providers.

The combination of a high population and a significant lack of quality specialty healthcare facilities has a profound negative impact on the people of Bihar. This is an onerous burden in a state that is already one of the five poorest in India, with a per capita income only half of that of the country as a whole.


Imagining infrastructure services in 2017

Laurence Carter's picture
Video: #IMAGINE a better future for all children | UNICEF


One of my favorite songs when I was growing up was John Lennon’s “Imagine.” A few months ago, UNICEF created a project around it to highlight the plight of millions of refugee children. As 2016 drew to a close, I couldn’t help but imagine a world with high-quality, affordable, sustainable, well-maintained infrastructure services for everyone.

I’m not sure a video of infrastructure projects set to “Imagine” would fire people up as much as the UNICEF video does. But there is value in reflecting on what we have accomplished in 2016, and what we might hope for and imagine in 2017, to bring this vision closer to reality for millions of people.

Need healthcare in India? Meghalaya is the place for you.

Pranav Mohan's picture



Imagine you fall ill or have a serious accident. You survive, but to recover you need extensive medical care. The problem? You don’t have insurance and have to pay out of pocket. Your life savings are quickly drained away, as are your dreams. Your children lose hope for higher education; your well-researched business plan becomes a work of fiction.

Measuring success in lives saved: A pioneering health partnership in Bangladesh

Paul da Rita's picture
Photo: Abir Abdullah/ADB

For millions of people throughout the world, a diagnosis of Chronic Kidney Disease ushers in a lifetime of dialysis treatments.  A dialysis session lasts four hours, and is required two to three times a week – so these treatments are often just as logistically challenging as they are physically difficult.  But the trials of treatment pale in comparison to no treatment at all, which was often the case for citizens of Bangladesh prior to 2015.  That was the year the government offered its citizens dialysis services through a pioneering public-private partnership (PPP) that increased the number of dialysis machines and broadened dialysis services by adding new capacity into existing public hospitals.
 
I’ve worked in the area of health PPPs for many years, and have seen first-hand how patients benefit from well-structured partnerships. At IFC, our goal is to work with governments with pressing health sector needs and help them develop the right kind of partnership to deliver improved health facilities and services. Like infrastructure PPPs, health PPPs are complicated, long-term deals—but unlike infrastructure PPPs, we have the opportunity to measure results in lives. This makes our work in the field of health PPPs especially important – and rewarding.

A PPP Encore in Brazil: Two healthcare partnerships boost Bahia’s ability to care for citizens

Tomas Anker's picture

 Sometimes, the most persuasive case for a PPP is the success of a past partnership in the same sector . That’s been true in the State of Bahia, Brazil, following the Hospital do Suburbio project, which closed in 2010 with help from IFC’s PPP advisory services and has been providing people in one of the State’s poorest suburbs with access to high quality healthcare. Based on the success of the PPP in meeting state government goals for improving local health services, Bahia government officials approached IFC again to discuss a new initiative – a partnership to offer imaging and diagnostic services and facilities across the state , including to rural communities.

Just as the Hospital do Suburbio emerged from great need, people in Bahia faced a shortage of high quality and complex imaging equipment and tests. Some of these were as basic as X-rays and mammography; others demanded state-of-the-art machines and services for CT Scans and MRI tests. This fed into the Bahia’s larger public health challenges, which included low bed turnovers and overcrowded hospitals.

The partnership with the private sector was created to solve this “package” of problems.  It was undertaken in partnership with the Brazilian Development Bank (BNDES) and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), which together manage the Brazil PSP Program fund, a project that fosters the development of infrastructure and services in Brazil in partnership with the private sector.

One question, eight experts, part eight: Thomas Maier

Thomas Maier's picture
Almaty, Kazakhstan. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

To gain a better understanding of how innovation in public-private partnerships (PPPs) builds on genuine learning, we reached out to PPP infrastructure experts around the world, posing the same question to each. Their honest answers redefine what works — and provide new insights into the PPP process. This is the question we posed: How can mistakes be absorbed into the learning process, and when can failure function as a step toward a PPP’s long-term success?

Our eighth and final response in this eight-part series comes from Thomas Maier, Managing Director, Infrastructure with the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD).

For countries new to PPPs, there is no doubt a steep learning curve. Fortunately, there is also a growing body of experience that such countries can learn from — the key is to understand the essence of the lessons and then incorporate these changes into the design of government support for PPPs.

Ultimately there is, of course, no substitute for good project preparation, local capacity and the development of solid legal frameworks and local capital markets — we all know these are the building blocks for the long-term success of any country’s PPP program.

Focusing on lessons learned from EBRD’s region, two current examples from Kazakhstan and Turkey come to mind.

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