In the past decade, the GCC countries have made a number of steps towards improving women’s access to education, health care, and employment, as well as encouraging women to participate in…

Issam Abousleiman |

It is undeniable that progress has been made in reducing extreme poverty over the last quarter century—from 36 percent of the world population in 1990 to an estimated 8.6 percent in 2018—and that…

Philippe H. Le Houérou, Antoinette Sayeh |

Financing UHC efficiently and equitably is important to ensure inclusive growth—especially since the health sector accounts for 11 percent of global GDP.

Kristalina Georgieva |

The force of digitalization is driving the global economy, creating distinct groups of leaders and laggards. Through institutional reform that leverages the advantages of digitalization, the…

Carlo Maria Rossotto, Marolla Haddad |

Data source: Statistics Bureau of Japan In 1966, Japan experienced a sudden drop in its fertility rate—for just that year. During the 1960s, the fertility rate was about 2.0 to 2.1 children per…

Emi Suzuki, Haruna Kashiwase |

Queen Alia International Airport, Jordan. © littlesam/Shutterstock [[tweetable]]In many developing countries, there are glaring gaps in the quantity of infrastructure per capita.[[/tweetable]] For…

Joaquim Levy, Zamir Iqbal |

© Dominic Chavez/Global Financing Facility [[tweetable]]Still today, in almost all societies around the world, women are less well-off than men.[[/tweetable]] Women are still paid less than men;…

Kristalina Georgieva |

People in Saint-Louis, Senegal. © Ibrahima BA Sané/World Bank [[tweetable]]Massive investment is needed to meet the ambitious goal of ending extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity by 2030…

Hartwig Schafer |

As the world becomes increasingly urbanized, the number of megacities is growing rapidly. Today there are 37 cities worldwide with populations of greater than 10 million, and 84 with populations…

Philip E. Karp, Peter Ellis, Barjor Mehta |

Students at Beijing Bayi High School in China. Photo: World Bank In 1950, the average working-age person in the world had  almost three years of education, but in East Asia and Pacific (EAP), the…

Michael Crawford |