Protecting ASEAN’s impressive gains over the past two decades will require prioritizing investments in people – that is, human capital.

Victoria Kwakwa |

In 107 of 114 economies, there are fewer female than male STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) graduates.

Divyanshi Wadhwa |

Interview by Kathy Chen, Consultant at the World Bank's Strategic Impact Evaluation Fund (SIEF).

Deon Filmer |

At the Annual Meetings of the World Bank Group and International Monetary Fund in Bali, Indonesia, the World Bank highlighted the importance of human capital for economic development.   Central to…

Julia Liberman, Rachel Cooper, Victoria Levin |

© Dominic Chavez/Global Financing Facility [[tweetable]]Still today, in almost all societies around the world, women are less well-off than men.[[/tweetable]] Women are still paid less than men;…

Kristalina Georgieva |

As one of the key foundations for manufacturing, trade and growth, logistics is a strategic component of every economy. The sector can also contribute significantly to job creation. For example,…

Yin Lam |

Labels matter. Girls who are reminded of stereotypes about how girls perform in math do worse on math exams (in some circumstances). Publicly revealing the caste of students in India led to worse…

David Evans |

Among the 29 countries and economies of the East Asia and Pacific region, one finds some of the world’s most successful education systems. Seven out of the top 10 highest average scorers on…

Michael Crawford |

  A new World Bank study finds that some Chilean technicians with a two-year degree have education returns that are only slightly lower than those of professionals. (Photo: Dominic Chavez/World…

Diego Angel-Urdinola |