In a post-COVID world, transport could become even more important to the social and economic inclusion of people across Latin America—especially women.

Maria Jose Gonzalez Rivas |

South Asian cities are known hotspots for air pollution. But in the last few months, many have enjoyed unusually clear skies and fresh air.

Muthukumara Mani, Takahiro Yamada |

Chiya (tea) Station, a small café in the middle of a busy market in Banepa, Kavrepalanchowk looks similar to other teashops in the area. From the outset, it is yet another emerging business but…

Deepa Rai |

From bus schedules to personal safety and gender roles, there are many different factors that can affect how women move around. A new World Bank study takes a closer look at women's mobility…

Karla Dominguez Gonzalez, Ana Luiza Machado, Bianca Bianchi Alves |

In cities around the world, an estimated 15 million people scrape together a living through informal waste picking. Many of them are women, children, elderly, unemployed, or migrants, who work…

Judy Baker |

Over the last five years, an extensive coalition of development partners has been working under the Bloomberg Philanthropies Initiative for Global Road Safety to make roads safer in 10 cities…

Alina Florentina Burlacu, Dipan Bose, Juan Miguel Velásquez, Dr. Soames Job, BA (Honours 1), PhD, GAICD, FACRS, Noor Ibrahim Mohamed |

Earthquakes, landslides and heavy rainfall often cause long-term disruption of transport systems in South Asia, resulting in economic setbacks affecting internal trade and regional integration.…

Masatsugu Takamatsu, Julian Palma |

The outsized risk of harassment that women face daily, in turn, affects their decisions whether to take a bus or even whether to get a job.

Andy Kotikula, Diana J. Arango |

The world is urbanizing at an unprecedented speed and scale, with more than half the global population living in cities today… rising to nearly 7 out of 10 people in cities by 2050.

Sameh Wahba |

While disasters such as earthquakes or floods affect everyone, their impacts are unevenly felt by different population groups.

Keiko Sakoda, Bandita Sijapati |