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Coordination, Collaboration and Connectivity for Better Border Management

Violane Konar-Leacy's picture
Coordinated border management (CBM) is key to unlocking trade facilitation challenges. Improving collaboration between border agencies and the private sector can result in moving and clearing goods faster and more cheaply. Better coordination, collaboration and connectivity are at the heart of our trade facilitation work at the World Bank Group.
  • Coordination: Coordinating the activities of different national border agencies in connection with import, export, or transit transaction

What’s challenging women as they seek to trade and compete in the global economy

Anabel Gonzalez's picture
The World Bank Group’s Trade & Competitiveness Global Practice is front and center in supporting our corporate Gender Strategy for 2016 to 2023. The strategy defines the level and type of support that the Bank Group is committed to provide to its client countries and firms to achieve greater gender equality.

Lowering Trade Costs through Transparency: the Importance of Trade Information Portals

Marcus Bartley Johns's picture
A lack of transparency: it is one of the most common complaints of the private sector in many developing countries where the World Bank Group works. Improved transparency can lower trade costs and improve predictability, and it is a key objective of international agreements like the World Trade Organization’s Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA). Implementation of the TFA is a key topic being discussed in Geneva at this week’s Sixth Global Review of Aid for Trade.  

Five actions that matter to the future of Aid for Trade

Anabel Gonzalez's picture
This week, myself and colleagues from the World Bank Group will participate in the World Trade Organization’s Sixth Global Review of Aid for Trade. The bi-annual meetings, held at WTO headquarters in Geneva, bring together trade ministers, civil society, international development institutions and the private sector to monitor progress made toward connecting developing countries to the global trade system.

What China’s Appetite for Meat means for Mongolia

Miles McKenna's picture
The concept of farm-to-fork can be complicated when it comes to meat. Fresh meat could be from the farm next door—or it could be from 10,000 kilometers away, having just arrived on a flight from the other side of the globe. With advances in cold chain transportation and logistics, distances that once took meat weeks to travel are covered in days, if not hours. And for a handful of low- and middle-income countries, meat exports are big business.  

Options for Developing Countries in an Evolving Trade Landscape

Nihal Pitigala's picture
A new trade policy landscape is emerging with slower trade growth and greater uncertainty. Both developed and developing countries alike are reevaluating their own trade strategies and alliances.  The WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA) and some of the key plurilateral agreements that cover trade in telecommunications, information technology, and government procurement, among others, reflect ongoing commitments to a multilateral system.

Steps to Better Data on E-Trade for Developing Countries

Michael Ferrantino's picture
UNCTAD’s E-Commerce Week took place recently in Geneva, Switzerland. This third E-Commerce Week was the largest ever, with over 900 registered participants, plus walk-ins from the Geneva community. This is nearly triple last year’s attendance. The large turnout reflected the heightened interest of developing countries in e-commerce as a tool for promoting economic growth and opportunity. Highlights of the week included the launch of the online platforms for the multi-stakeholder E-Trade For All initiative  and its private-sector partner Business For E-Trade Development, and a special panel on digital transformation for small businesses and entrepreneurs, featuring Alibaba’s Jack Ma.

Helping Firms Diversify, One Incentive at a Time: the Experience of Nepal

Gonzalo Varela's picture
Policymakers care about export diversification. High product and market concentration increases a country’s vulnerability to external shocks. Sudden closure of export markets triggered by regulatory changes or dramatic changes in international prices, for example, could even threaten macroeconomic stability when export baskets are concentrated.

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