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Jim Kim in Mali: Stability Vital for Prosperity

Jim Yong Kim's picture

TIMBUKTU, Mali - Months after a rebel attack was rebuffed in Mali, the country is striving to stabilize in order to fight poverty and boost shared prosperity. I'm visiting the West African nation with UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to underline international commitment to the region.

World Bank Group President Kim and Pope Francis Discuss Mutual Efforts to End Poverty

Jim Yong Kim's picture
Also available in: Español

VATICAN CITY — Like many people around the world, I've been closely following Pope Francis' comments on the importance of serving the poor. When I had a chance to meet the His Holiness at the Vatican, I had the privilege to talk to about it — and about helping lead a social movement to end extreme poverty. Watch the video blog to learn more.

Social Media at the World Bank: What Can You Get for #1dollar?

Liana Pistell's picture

Imagine you only had $1 in your pocket. What would you spend it on? Food? Electricity? Fuel? Shelter? More than 1 billion people live in extreme poverty —  less than $1.25 a day. World Bank President Jim Yong Kim has called this a “moral stain on our collective conscience” and has challenged world leaders to commit to ending extreme poverty by 2030. 

If you agree that we can end poverty by 2030, add your voice by telling world leaders that ending extreme poverty is a goal shared by everyone, everywhere. 

How can you join the fight to end poverty:

Labbing and Learning: Scaling Innovation at the World Bank Group

Aleem Walji's picture
Also available in: Español | العربية | Français

Aleem Walji, director of the World Bank’s Innovation Labs, recently gave an interview to Forbes and the Skoll World Forum on all things innovation and development. This blog post highlights some of the key points from that interview.

When I joined the World Bank at the end of 2009, I was asked how we could more systematically support innovation. We started by building on the Bank’s own “access to information” policy, which was foundational for our Open Data initiative. When we made our data available to the world in a machine-readable format, searchable, and reusable, back in April 2010, people came in droves. Within months, we had more traffic to our data catalogue than the World Bank homepage.

Another powerful insight we had was to link maps through “Mapping for Results” with poverty data and project results to show the relationship between where we lend, where poor people live, and the results of our work. While it may sound simple or obvious, even today development partners struggle to map the relationship between projects they fund and poverty indicators in a given country. We quickly realized the value of “mapping aid” and making aid data transparent and comparable. The Open Aid Partnership grew out of that impulse.

The Time to End Poverty Is Now

Joachim von Amsberg's picture



If you saw how poor I was before, you would see that things are getting better.
 
When I hear stories like that of Jean Bosco Hakizimana, a Burundian farmer whose life was transformed by a cow, I get excited about the change we can all make. Jean Bosco’s income is improving, his kids are eating better, his wife has some nice clothes, and his manioc fields are yielding better harvests — all thanks to the milk and fertilizer from this one cow.
 
A similar story is playing out in more than 2,600 communities across Burundi, offering new life to a people once decimated by civil war. These community agricultural programs sponsored by the International Development Association (IDA), the World Bank’s fund for the poorest, show that development doesn’t have to be that complicated and that collective effort can make all the difference.

A Lesson from Malala: Girls’ Education Pays Off

Sri Mulyani Indrawati's picture



When I heard the news last autumn that 15-year-old Malala Yousafzai of Pakistan had been shot simply for standing up for her right as a girl to get an education, I was horrified.

It also reminded me how lucky I was.

When I was offered a rare scholarship to study abroad, it wasn’t acceptable for me, as a young married Indonesian woman, to live apart from my husband. My mother laid out two options: Either he would join me, which meant giving up his job, or I had to decline the offer.

I know it was her way to advocate for my husband to support me, which he did without hesitation. We both went to the United States to complete our master’s degrees. I combined it with a doctorate in economics, and we had our first child, a daughter, while we both were graduate students.

Viewer's Guide: Live Coverage of the 2013 Spring Meetings

Lauren Clyne Medley's picture

Available in Español | Français | عربي

With the World Bank Group’s 2013 Spring Meetings just around the corner, we’ve compiled a guide to the many live events happening. No matter where you are around the world, you can join the conversation all week via #wblive.

Several featured events will be webcast and covered in multiple languages. Make sure to follow and participate in the week’s events in Arabic, English, French, and Spanish.
Your thoughts and questions will help make the conversations happening both online and offline at this year’s Spring Meetings rich and diverse. Don’t forget to ask questions before and during our events to engage with top development leaders in a global conversation on what #ittakes to end poverty.

Flagship Event: April 19
Global Voices on Poverty – Interactive Live Blog & Webcast
Watch and join the conversation in Arabic, English, French, and Spanish
11:00 a.m.-12:10 p.m. EDT (15:00-16:10 GMT or convert time)
Participate in an interactive conversation on ending poverty with World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim and UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moonGlobal Voices on Poverty will bring together world leaders, opinion makers, and a global online audience to discuss what #ittakes to end poverty.

A Chance to Make History: Achieving a World Free of Poverty

Jim Yong Kim's picture

In two weeks, economic policymakers from around the world will gather in Washington, D.C., for the World Bank-IMF Spring Meetings. As has been the case for the past five years, there will be much talk of economic crisis and of strategies to restore confidence, kick start growth, and create jobs. There is growing evidence that we are on the right track, but this agenda still requires much more work. 

The meetings, though, also offer an occasion to look beyond the short term crisis-fighting measures. It is a chance for leaders to adopt a long-term perspective and assess where we stand and where we are headed.

 

If they do, they will see that today we are at a moment of historic opportunity. For the end of absolute poverty, a dream which has enticed and driven humanity for centuries, is now within our grasp.

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