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Liviane Urquiza's picture
Also available in: Français | Español

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Definition: Physical, mental, and social well-being.

Good health is an important foundation for economic growth and a thriving society. In the developing world, poor health produces a vicious cycle: the same conditions that create poverty put health at increased risk. Hazardous conditions include unsafe and unclean environments, inadequate nutrition, and lack of access to medical care. Societies emerging from conflict often have a population at increased risk of mental health problems. Individuals in any crisis situation are at increased risk of mental health problems. Read the issue brief »
 

Age Is Nothing but a Number: Bridging the Gap between the Young and the Old

Viva Dadwal's picture
Does this sound familiar?
 
“Why are young people so loud, lazy, and destructive?”
 
“We’re looking for a more mature candidate to handle this job.”
 
Now, what about this?
 
“Why are old people so boring, slow, and angry all the time?”
 
“We need young, dynamic graduates with energy to join our team.”

 

Côte d’Ivoire’s Emerging Young Entrepreneurs

Jamie Lee's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

Kone Gninlnagnon

Kone Gninlnagnon is a young entrepreneur who dreams of exporting rice from Côte d’Ivoire to the world.

But he knows the quality of the rice must be improved and tested in the domestic market first. Thus, a new business idea was born: helping to make homegrown rice more competitive. “We cannot win the loyalty of consumers with bad quality rice,” he says. His project, “Riz Ivoire,” would promote the rice that comes from the heart of Côte d’Ivoire and help deliver high-quality rice to Ivorian dining tables. He also wants to encourage other Ivorian youth to invest in “rizculture.”

Now Gninlnagnon is one step closer to achieving his dream. His project won third place in the Start-up Competition at ICI 2014, the Fourth Côte d‘Ivoire National Investment Forum that took place in the city of Abidjan in January. While the three-day event focused on investment opportunities in the country’s key sectors like agriculture, industry, and infrastructure, the spotlight of the closing ceremony fell on entrepreneurship and the youth of Côte d’Ivoire, as they are the drivers of future growth and innovation in the post-conflict country. Côte d’Ivoire aims to be an emerging market economy by 2020. In 2013, the country’s growth rate was 8.7%.

Young and Eager to Work on Policymaking: A Few Inspiring Examples

Liviane Urquiza's picture

Some preconceptions are universal. Whether  in Europe, South America, East or South Asia, in urban or rural areas, pretty much everywhere I have been I have heard young people explain why they dislike politics, either because it is boring or because they believe all politicians are corrupt. Did they – did you? – ever wonder what the world would be like if there were no policies, and no policymakers? Think about it.

5 Things You Need to Know about Open Government

Ravi Kumar's picture


The Internet is abuzz with articles and commentary on how to make government more open. Open government benefits us all. The end result makes governments efficient and responsive, ultimately improving citizens’ lives. Here are some simple answers to questions on open government. Of course, a list like this always needs a disclaimer: This article doesn’t provide you a comprehensive understanding of the open government movement. But it’s a start.

If You Could Help End Extreme Poverty, Would You? We Can. Let's Take It On.

Ravi Kumar's picture
Also available in: Français | Español | العربية



Talent is everywhere, but opportunities are not. That’s the conventional belief.

Today, after listening to some amazing young people speak about their lives at Thursday’s End Poverty event at the World Bank, I’m convinced that opportunities are omnipresent.

These youth have one thing in common: They all want to take on poverty and want everyone else to join them. For the first time in history, we can end extreme poverty, and we can do it by 2030. It’s the right thing to do.

Confucius, a Chinese philosopher who lived in the fifth century B.C., said that when we are faced with what’s right, “to leave it undone shows a lack of courage.” Today, four inspiring youth leaders were at the World Bank Group in Washington, D.C. to do what is right by helping to launch a global movement to end extreme poverty by 2030.

One of them, Chernor Bah, was born during a civil war in the slums of Freetown, the capital city of Sierra Leone. Access to basic needs such as food was a privilege for him. His mom’s resilience helped him get education, he passionately told an energetic, youthful crowd. When he grew up he took it upon himself to mobilize young people to help increase access to education. Today he serves as the chairman of the Youth Advocacy Group for the Global Education First Initiative. Its goal is “to accelerate progress towards the Education for All goals and the education-related Millennium Development Goals.”

A Young African Entrepreneur Invests in Caterpillars to Fight Malnutrition

Anne Senges's picture
Eating shea caterpillars

While the shea tree is known for its nuts, used to produce a butter to which myriad benefits have been attributed (skin and nutritional, in particular), much less is known about the caterpillars that feed on its leaves. And this is precisely what a young man from Burkina Faso has set out to change. 

What’s the Relationship between Youth, Open Government, and Development?

Felipe Estefan's picture
Also available in: Español | Français | العربية
Youth demand openness
Percentage of youth who said they want their government to be more open. Source: Global Opening Government Survey

We live in a time unlike any other in our history.
 
Today, many more of us have more tools to more quickly exchange more knowledge and expertise than ever before.
 

Education Helps Afghanistan’s Youth Rebuild Their War-Torn Nation

Bassam Sebti's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français | Español | 中文


It was once called “the Burned School” and children weren’t able to attend classes. Just like many other things affected by years of conflict in Afghanistan’s capital, Kabul, Nahid Shahid School was the victim of violence that destroyed many aspects of the country.

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