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What’s behind a number? Information systems and the road to universal health coverage

Fernando Montenegro Torres's picture



Maya is waiting for the physician to call her name. Her three children play in the waiting room, making happy noises, but she is worried about her health. The physician confirms her worst fears: it turns out that she has cervical cancer. Now what? A social worker tries to comfort her, saying that the medical staff will do their best to get her treated soon so that she can keep on working to sustain her family.

Communicating to the group: A normative understanding of social norms

David Jodrell's picture

How do social norms affect behaviors?  How can development programs benefit from a clearer understanding of them?  David Jodrell of BBC Media Action offers insight on the influence of social norms and the potential role that media can play in promoting positive changes.

A girl stands to answer a teacher's questions in a crowded classroomInterventions targeting social norms have long been part and parcel of the international development landscape.  But following on the heels of the World Development Report 2015[1], how to measure – and capture the impact – of these interventions is the subject of rising attention.
 
There is particular interest in research around how social norms can contribute to behavioural change in the governance sector – in areas such as conflict resolution and women’s empowerment – as well as to help realise health objectives such as reducing open defecation or ending female genital mutilation. At BBC Media Action, where I work, we explore how media and communication intersect with social norms around some of these issues.
 

Global Daily: U.S. private sector employment rises firmly in June

Global Macroeconomics Team's picture
Financial Markets

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras urged voters on Wednesday to reject austerity measures in Sunday’s referendum on Greece’s bailout package offered by creditors, saying that a “no” vote does not mean a rejection of the euro, but would instead increase pressure on international creditors to give the country an economically viable deal.  Germany said earlier there could be no talks on a new bailout until after Greece’s referendum on July 5th.

Arup Banerji: Universal access to social protection at the core of World Bank Group's twin goals

Arup Banerji's picture
Yesterday, the World Bank Group together with the International Labour Organization (ILO) announced a mission and a plan of action towards universal access to social protection. I share my thoughts on how this announcement is at the core of the Bank's goals of ending poverty and boosting shared prosperity, and how universal access to social protection is linked to the sustainable development goals. 

Campaign Art: Stand with #WithStrongGirls

Roxanne Bauer's picture

People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

In contrast to previous anti-poverty music campaigns that have been criticised for overlooking African musicians and misrepresenting the continent, a new video from One’s poverty is sexist campaign features nine female musicians from seven African countries.

The song, “Strong Girl” is an anthem calling for women and girls to be central to the fight against poverty with targeted investments in areas such as education and health to overcome barriers that disproportionately affect women. The song is also a call to action for citizens worldwide to put pressure on their leaders to empower girls and women in the poorest countries, so that they can lift their own communities out of poverty.
 
VIDEO: Strong Girl


ASET can be a great asset to Africa

Sajitha Bashir's picture



The African continent is on the cusp of a major transformation. Many economies are growing, with growth driven by investments in infrastructure and energy, trade, and by a stable macro-economic environment. I think that this growth will lead to socio-economic transformation (with higher-income jobs and a better quality of life) if it is also accompanied by building skills and research capacity in applied sciences, engineering, and technology (ASET).

Think you know everything about the World Bank's Open Agenda? Take the challenge!

Davinia Levy's picture

Did you know that the World Bank has a repository of more than 200,000 documents and reports at your disposal, dating all the way back to 1947? Did you also know that you can access over 18,000 development indicators, and much more?

The World Bank is celebrating the 5th anniversary of its Access to Information Policy. Since its launch in 2010, the World Bank has emerged as a global leader in the openness agenda and has disclosed a wealth of information to the public.

Digital IDs: A powerful platform for enhanced service delivery across all sectors

Mariana Dahan's picture
Lack of personal official identification (ID) prevents people from fully exercising their rights and isolates them socially and economically — voting, legal action, receipt of government benefits, banking, and borrowing are all virtually closed off. The widespread lack of ID in developing countries is a critical stumbling block to national growth.
 
Digital IDs can help provide access to
critical services, including health care.

Digital IDs, combined with the already extensive use of mobile devices in the developing world, offers a transformative solution to the problem — a simple means for capturing personal ID that can reach far more people, as well as and new, more efficient ways for government and business to reach and serve the population.
 
Given the importance of the topic, the 2016 World Development Report (WDR) includes a Spotlight on Digital Identity, which has been developed by the authors in collaboration with various stakeholders within and outside the World Bank Group.

The 2016 WDR — the World Bank's major analytical publication — aims to advance our understanding of how economic growth, equity of opportunity and public service delivery are being affected by rapid diffusion of digital technologies. This section in 2016 WDR focuses on critical aspects, such as benefits to developing countries and implementation arrangements for Digital ID programs.

What are we doing to promote family and prevent its extinction in development?

Leszek J. Sibilski's picture

Family from Anmu village, Zanskar, IndiaMost sociologists consider the family unit to be a fundamental building block of society. However, it is largely absent as a topic in international development goals. Should this be the case?

"The great danger for family life, in the midst of any society whose idols are pleasure, comfort and independence, lies in the fact that people close their hearts and become selfish." - Pope John Paul II
 
A recent report led by Stanford, Princeton, and Berkeley universities said vertebrates are disappearing at a rate 114 times faster than normal. These findings echo those of a similar report published by Duke University last year. One of the new study’s authors said: “We are now entering the sixth great mass extinction event.” The last such event was 65 million years ago, when dinosaurs were wiped out, in all likelihood by a large meteor hitting Earth.
 
In light of this apocalypse-like news, I would like to take a closer look at yet another endangered, but a bit more tangible element of life on planet Earth, namely, the family. As humankind, along with plants and animals approach what is being called the sixth great mass extinction, I wonder if it will be an event that humans go through en masse as loners, (the atomistic man as the only unit in society), or as people knit together by ties to a nuclear and extended family. I often think that the role of the family is too-often neglected and has been taken for granted in our day. The all-consuming drive and ambitious personal priority of the individual in today’s world makes me worry that families may one day go, and, as the family goes, so will go civilization.


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