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Swedish firms provide training and consider an inadequately educated workforce as the major obstacle to their operations

Silvia Muzi's picture
The private sector is a critical driver of job creation and economic growth. However, several factors can undermine private enterprise and, if left unresolved, may blunt growth. Through rigorous face-to-face interviews with managers and owners of private firms, the World Bank Group’s Enterprise Surveys benchmark the business environment in countries, based on the direct experiences of firms.
 

Global Data Lab: a resource for subnational development indicators from household surveys

Jeroen Smits's picture

This is a guest blog written by Jeroen Smits of the Global Data Lab, an initiative hosted by the Nijmegen Center for Economics (NiCE) at Radboud University in the Netherlands.  

Disaggregation of indicators at the subnational level is one of the key elements to effectively monitor the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). At the same time, this is a great challenge, as in the case for many countries, only indicators at the national level are available.
 
This is particularly the case for poor countries, where administrative systems are less equipped and capable to generate reliable and representative information. Strengthening those systems is the preferred solution, but that takes time and does not produce the indicators for earlier years required for tracing developments over time.

Reducing inequality by promoting shared prosperity

Nobuo Yoshida's picture

This is part of a series of blogs focused on the Sustainable Development Goals and data from the 2016 Edition of World Development Indicators.

In more than half the countries with data, the poorest 40 percent are achieving faster growth

Sustainable Development Goal target 10.1 aims to progressively achieve, by 2030, sustained income growth among the poorest 40 percent of the population at a rate higher than the national average in every country. This echoes the World Bank’s goal of promoting shared prosperity, although the World Bank does not set a specific target for each country but aims to foster income growth among the poorest 40 percent in every country.

The all-new Open Data website is here

Tim Herzog's picture
The time has come to bid a fond farewell to the open data website that has served us well for almost six years. Next week we will launch the most significant upgrade to the World Bank’s Open Data website since its initial debut in 2010. We first announced this upgrade when we launched the site as a public beta a few months ago.

Children nearly twice more likely to be poor than adults in Latin America

Oscar Calvo-González's picture
Also available in: Español | Portuguese

Childhood poverty in Latin America has declined steadily but remains much higher than poverty among adults. In 2014 poverty among children stood at 36 percent, almost twice the rate for adults (19 percent - see briefing note). The chart below shows that poverty has decreased for both adults and children, but a closer look at the data reveals that childhood poverty has been declining at a slower pace than among adults.
 

Chart: 25 Years of Progress Across IDA Countries

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: Français | 中文 | العربية | Español | 日本語

The International Development Association (IDA) is one of the largest sources of assistance for the world's poorest countries. Over the past 25 years, IDA countries have seen progress on many fronts. These include greater access to clean water and sanitation, improvements in school completion rates, higher rates of childhood vaccination and higher rates of mobile phone use.

Measuring surgical systems: a new paradigm for health systems strengthening

Josh Ng-Kamstra's picture
Also available in: Español | 中文 | Français | العربية


This is a companion blog to the series of blogs from the 2016 Edition of World Development Indicators. It is a guest contribution from colleagues involved in the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery


Click for interactive version

Around the world, more than two-thirds of people still cannot access safe, affordable surgical and anesthesia care when they need it. The impact of surgical disease is not trivial;  30 percent of the world’s burden of disease is estimated to be caused by conditions requiring the care of a surgeon. Such conditions are estimated to cost low- and middle-income countries up to USD 12.3 trillion in lost economic output by 2030. Moreover, 81 million individuals face financial ruin due to expenses incurred while receiving surgical care each year.

The delivery of surgery is critical for the realization of many of the Sustainable Development Goals: Good health and well-being (Goal 3);  No poverty (Goal 1); Gender equality  (Goal 5), and Reducing inequalities (Goal 10).

Describing access to surgery as a treatment modality or platform of care, with relevant country-level data requires a rigorous deconstruction of the components of access upon which national governments can intervene. To this end, Dr. Jim Kim challenged the surgical community in 2014 to develop surgical indicators, along with “time-bound targets” to which the world can aspire.

Chart: A Fast Fall in Growth Among Commodity Exporters

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: Español | العربية

In 2016, emerging markets and developing economies are forecast to grow by 3.5% - slightly lower than the recent average. Within this group, trends vary between commodity exporters and importers. In 2016, importers are expected to see steady 5.8% growth, but exporters are struggling to adjust to persistently low commodity prices and are forecast to grow only 0.4%. Read more in the The June 2016 Global Economic Prospects report.
 

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