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Mở rộng chương trình vệ sinh môi trường tại Việt Nam

Parameswaran Iyer's picture
Also available in: English
Một người dân ở Hòa Bình vui mừng khi xây được nhà vệ sinh mới. Ảnh: Chương trình Nước và vệ sinh mội trường của Ngân hàng Thế giới.


Vệ sinh môi trường mang lại nhiều lợi ích như giảm chi phí chữa bệnh, nâng cao chất lượng cuộc sống, tăng cường an toàn cho phụ nữ và các em gái, đó là chưa kể đến những ích lợi kinh tế tuyệt vời mà vệ sinh mang lại. Nhưng nếu muốn tận dụng được hết những lợi ích đó thì cần phải có các cách tiếp cận mới áp dụng trên qui mô rộng và thúc đẩy tiếp cận bình đẳng. Như Eddie Perez, Chuyên gia trưởng về vệ sinh môi trường, Chương trình Nước sạch và Vệ sinh của Ngân hàng Thế giới, đã chia sẻ trong blog gần đây gây về quá trình loại bỏ bất bình đẳng và giúp mọi người đều có thể tiếp cận dịch vụ đòi hỏi một sự chuyển đổi và từ bỏ cách làm theo lối mòn cũ. (Đọc bài viết bằng Tiếng Anh: Tại sao và bằng cách nào các nước có thể phấn đấu hoàn thành mục tiêu vệ sinh nông thôn cho toàn dân vào năm 2030) và Khắc phục cung ứng dịch vụ vệ sinh cho người nghèo tiến tới hoàn thành mục tiêu kép).

Taking Sanitation to Scale in Vietnam

Parameswaran Iyer's picture
Also available in: Tiếng Việt
A resident in Hoa Binh Province is happy with his newly built toilet. Photo: World Bank’s Water and Sanitation Program



Sanitation brings numerous benefits such as reducing the burden of disease, improving quality of life, promoting the safety of women and girls, not to mention the excellent economic investment that sanitation represents. Yet, to realize these benefits, new approaches are needed that work at scale and promote equality of access. As Eddie Perez, Lead Sanitation Specialist at the World Bank’s Water and Sanitation Program, recently highlighted in his excellent blog posts, eliminating inequalities and achieving universal access requires transformational change and a departure from ‘business as usual’. (Read ‘How and Why Countries are Changing to Reach Universal Access in Rural Sanitation by 2030’ and ‘Fixing Sanitation Service Delivery for the Poor to Meet the Twin Goals’).

Philippines: Owning a Toilet is a Sign of Progress

Karl Galing's picture

In the quiet village of Bantayanon in Negros Occidental, Ligaya Almunacid showed off her new toilet.  “This is my dream toilet,” she told us. Hers is not the typical structure made of palm-thatched roof and walls commonly seen in the area, but rather made of concrete hollow blocks with galvanized iron roofing. 
 
The 48-year old lady was all smiles throughout our conversation, telling us what she liked about the toilet. “I wanted my toilet to be durable especially since our house sits in the middle of a flood-prone area.” Ligaya recalled how difficult it was in the past when her family had to share their neighbor’s toilet, or take the risk of getting bitten by snakes in the field just to relieve themselves.  On closer examination, it would seem that she made the right decision in building a hygienic and resilient structure in securing her family’s health and welfare.

We Children Can Help Other Children Too

Mateo Fernandez's picture
Also available in: Bahasa Indonesia



​Hi, my name is Mateo. I am 9 years old. Every night my mom reads me a story.  Many times she tells me a story about how some boys are fortunate to be born rich, and some are not. My mom always reminds me that I am among the fortunate.  My mom helps a program called the Program Keluarga Harapan that teaches less fortunate mothers to educate their kids. The less fortunate mothers work extra hard, because they want their children to have a better future than them.

Ketika Anak-Anak Membantu Sesama

Mateo Fernandez's picture
Also available in: English



Halo, nama saya Mateo. Umur saya 9 tahun. Tiap malam Ibu selalu membacakan cerita. Katanya di dunia ini ada anak-anak yang beruntung karena lahir dari keluarga mampu, ada pula yang tidak. Menurut Ibu saya termasuk di antara mereka yang beruntung. Ibu bekerja membantu sebuah program yang diberi nama Program Keluarga Harapan. Program ini membantu mengajarkan para ibu dari keluarga tidak mampu bagaimana mendidik anak-anaknya. Ibu dari keluarga tidak mampu harus bekerja ekstra keras, karena mereka mau anak-anaknya punya masa depan yang lebih baik.
 

Philippines: One Year after Typhoon Haiyan: Social Protection Reduces Vulnerabilities to Disaster and Climate Risks

Mohamad Al-Arief's picture
  • Countries can respond to natural disasters better and assist victims faster if  social protection systems are in place
  • Social protection systems have a role  in addressing the human side of disaster and climate risks.
  • Global collaboration on mitigating disaster and climate risk through social protection systems  facilitates solutions
Social protection specialists, disaster risk managers, risk finance practitioners and climate change experts at the World Bank Group sat down together recently to discuss the role of social protection systems in addressing the human side of disaster and climate risks.
 
Together with government counterparts and donor partners, they extracted lessons and came out with a compelling message: countries can respond to natural disasters better and assist victims faster if robust social protection systems are in place.

Realizing the hopes of unemployed youth in Papua New Guinea

Walai Punena Jacklyn Tongia's picture



I met Gilford Jirigani at a workshop in Port Moresby a few months ago. What struck me about him was his natural confidence and poise as he captured the audience’s attention - including mine-as he told us how one project changed his life. He went from being an unemployed kid, down and out and unclear about his life in the city, to eventually becoming one of the pioneers of a youth program aimed at increasing the employability of unemployed youth in Port Moresby in 2012.

Of Seasons and Typhoons

Leonardo B. Paat Jr's picture
Communities living along the coast in Cebu province are at highly at risk to the impacts of climate change.

Having grown up in Cagayan, a province in the northeastern most part of the Philippines, our lives have always been defined by the wet and dry season as well as typhoons. My childhood memories are dotted with events when our village would be flooded or hit by typhoons. There were times when we had to evacuate and once permanently relocate following a catastrophic flooding of the province due to the swelling of the Cagayan River. My grandfather, then a tobacco farmer, would despair as his crops were frequently wiped out due to either flooding or drought. I recall that he once said that perhaps the seasons were also going senile (the popular saying in Filipino is “ulyaning panahon) as they cannot seem to remember when they are supposed to occur.

Developing the Youth Workforce in Solomon Islands

Stephen Close's picture



I see it every time I come back to Honiara, Solomon Island’s bustling capital, soon after I arrive.  Young people on the streets, wandering around in groups or by themselves with nothing to do.  It’s the same thing my local friends and colleagues mention.  Solomon Islanders also ask, “What kind of future lies ahead for our kids?” 

Solomon Islands face new economic challenges and a rapidly expanding, youthful population.  Seven out of 10 Solomon Islanders are under the age of 29. 

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