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Weekly links April 21: hostile attitudes to random assignment, scaling up, we make it easier to search the blog, contagious exercise, and more…

David McKenzie's picture

Is bigger better? Agriculture edition

Markus Goldstein's picture
One of the more exciting sessions I went to at the recent Centre for the Study of African Economies Conference was on the relationship between agricultural plot size and productivity.  I walked out of the session not sure of the shape of the relationship, but I was sure of the fact that there is a lot of measurement error going on.   And this is measurement error that matters a lot.  
 

Scaling Up Effective Programs – Kenya and Liberia Edition

David Evans's picture
Over the last decade, both Kenya and Liberia have sought to scale up successful pilot programs that help children to learn to read. Even as more and more impact evaluations are of programs at scale, pilots still constitute a significant portion of what we test. That’s with good reason: Governments wisely seek to pilot and test programs before expending valuable resources in implementing a program across the country.

Weekly Links, April 7: Unpaywall, good and fake news from Malawi, doing research in conflict zones, and more...

Berk Ozler's picture
  • Just this week, I provided a journalist with a bunch of citations, most of which she could not access. Perhaps, no more? LSE Impact Blog discusses the Unpaywall: "The extension is called Unpaywall, and it’s powered by an open index of more than ten million legally-uploaded, open access resources. Reports from our pre-release are great: “Unpaywall found a full-text copy 53% of the time,” reports librarian, Lydia Thorne. Fisheries researcher Lachlan Fetterplace used Unpaywall to find “about 60% of the articles I tested. This one is a great tool and I suspect it will only get better.” And indeed it has! We’re now getting full-text on 85% of 2016’s most-covered research papers."  

In the medium term, school rules!

Markus Goldstein's picture
The past decades have seen large increase in primary enrollment, and a closing (for most, but not all, countries) of the gender gap in enrolment.    The next step is to look at secondary school.   A nice new paper by Esther Duflo, Pascaline Dupas and Michael Kremer looks at what happens when you make it accessible to more young people.
 

Development Impact turns 6: six questions for our sixth birthday

David McKenzie's picture
We are proud to have kept the blog going for another year, and would like to note its 6th birthday. In lieu of presents, we’d love your thoughts on what things you would like to see more or less of going forward. In particular, any comments or feedback on the following would be great:

Weekly links March 31: inequality across firms and within households, measuring farm labor, should we fund research by lottery, and more…

David McKenzie's picture
  • In the Harvard Business Review, Nick Bloom discusses how a lot of inequality is getting driven by differences between firms: “companies are paying more to get more: boosting salaries to recruit top talent or to add workers with sought-after skills. The result is that highly skilled and well-educated workers flock to companies that can afford to offer generous salaries, benefits, and perks — and further fuel their companies’ momentum. Employees in less-successful companies continue to be poorly paid and their companies fall further behind”
  • Vox EU piece by Brown, van de Walle and Ravallion summarizing their work in two recent papers on the difficulties in targeting the poor “about three-quarters of underweight women and undernourished children are not found in the poorest 20% of households. This is consistent with evidence of considerable intra-household inequality”

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