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Out-of-school children: a promise yet to be fulfilled

Quentin Wodon's picture



Today, as the Millennium Development Goals draw to a close and the development community is thinking of new development targets, many children are not learning in school. But, in addition, more than 120 million children and young adolescents still remain out of school. That is almost one in ten children of primary school age, and one in seven children of lower secondary school age. For these children, the right to education remains a distant dream.

Don’t give up on student loans: The changing patterns of returns to schooling and policy implications

Harry A. Patrinos's picture


The latest evidence on the private rates of returns to schooling shows that the returns to primary education are no longer the highest, having been surpassed by tertiary education. In my blog, Make the Rich Pay for University: Changing Patterns of Returns to Schooling, I argue that this suggests three things:

The PISA for Development initiative moves forward: Have my wishes been fulfilled?

Marguerite Clarke's picture



About a year and a half ago, I wrote a blog about the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) PISA for Development initiative.
 
Most of us are already familiar with the OECD’s PISA exercise, which is a test that assesses the reading, mathematics, and science competencies of 15-year olds around the world. The aim of PISA for Development is to identify how PISA can support evidence-based policy making in developing countries that, until now, have been unable or unwilling to participate. The expected outcome is to produce a set of enhanced student assessment instruments that are tailored to the needs of these countries, but which also produce reading, mathematics, and science scores on the same scale as the main PISA survey. In that earlier blog, I made three wishes for the initiative. 

Have any of my wishes been fulfilled?

The Impact of Education Management Information Systems: The Case of Afghanistan

Samantha de Silva's picture


In some fragile states, where the education sector has faced direct attack, physical monitoring of development programs becomes a hugely complex and dangerous task. In this context, Afghanistan is an excellent example of how investment in Education Management Information Systems (EMIS) can strengthen overall monitoring systems in a country.  In some provinces, there has been an improvement in accountability and transparency but challenges remain.    

The Great Challenge in Tertiary Education: Is it really just about the fees?

Francisco Marmolejo's picture



The title of the recent blog written by my colleague Harry Patrinos couldn’t be more direct and clear: “Make the Rich Pay for University”! This is an idea that makes sense. However, is this idea as easy to implement as it sounds? Are there any disadvantages or limitations? What is the rationale used in countries that have opted for the opposite direction?

Technical Education in India: What Makes Good Governance “Good”?

Jessica Lee's picture


During a recent trip to India, we met with Professor Anil Sahasrabudhe, a dynamic, positive man who will likely remind you of a favorite uncle. In 2004, he was in the less satisfactory position of being director at the College of Engineering in Pune (COEP), located 150 km southeast of Mumbai. At that time, the institution had no financial or academic autonomy, no governance structure, and no administrative freedom. Ten years later, in 2014, the institution had turned around, garnering national awards and recognition. What helped spark the change? While several factors made an impact, Professor Sahasrabudhe mentions good governance first.

Make the Rich Pay for University: Changing Patterns of Returns to Schooling

Harry A. Patrinos's picture



At a time when students, parents and governments are looking with concern at ever increasing levels of student loan debt, the returns to schooling seem to be declining, on average, at least slightly.
 
The value one gets from an education, in terms of future earnings, has been decreasing over time. The returns to another year of schooling tend to decline as the level of schooling rises in an economy.

Leveling the Playing Field from the Start: The Power of Early Childhood Development

Claudia Costin's picture


Today, I had the pleasure of participating in a keynote discussion at the Education World Forum in London--a large annual gathering of education decisionmakers from around the world. We focused this morning on how to use and translate data generated by education systems into better policies and effective results.

My fellow panelists which included Baroness Lindsay Northover, Parliamentary Undersecretary of State at the UK’s Department for International Development, and Professor Eric Hanushek from Stanford University, made excellent points about the link between education outcomes and economic growth. They also spoke about the ways to reach the 58 million children from marginalized communities who remain out of school.
 
I chose to focus on investments in the youngest children, from birth to age 5, before they even enter primary school.

A System of Great Schools: Joel Klein’s Legacy in New York City

Harry A. Patrinos's picture

Imagine a situation where: there are low graduation rates; violence spills into the schools; where most students are poorly educated; where there is growing inequality; students are passed from grade to grade even if they don’t learn; and there are unemployed graduates – yet skilled jobs go unfilled.  Imagine a school system ruled by a government-run monopoly dominated by vested and political interests.  There is no accountability – nobody is held responsible for results.  There is little information or data available with which to manage the system.

Does this sound like a developing country you know?  But no, this isn’t a description of fragile state, or a low-income country.  It’s not a caricature of a developing country run by a corrupt leader, on the brink of social and economic decline.

It’s New York City in the early 2000s.

For Haiti, New Data Can Help Address Learning Gaps

Melissa Adelman's picture


With 95 percent of its population of 10 million under age 65, Haiti’s most abundant asset is its human capital. Given this large share of children, youth and working-age adults, education is both an ongoing challenge and policy priority for the Government of Haiti. Yet decision-making on education has been hampered by a lack of reliable data, with even basic information such as enrollment rates being difficult to estimate reliably. 

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