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Education for all: Unfinished business

Aaron Benevot's picture


The 2015 Education for All Global Monitoring Report – Education for All 2000-2015: Achievements and Challenges– will be launched at the World Bank in Washington today, bringing together international leaders in the fields of education, development and aid to take stock of major achievements and setbacks and discuss recommendations to support the ambitious post-2015 education agenda.

Казахстанcкие предприниматели: превращение мечты в реальность через образование и профподготовку

Keiko Inoue's picture


Этой зимой я побывала в Центре занятости в г. Караганда, Казахстан, где встретилась с людьми заинтересованными в открытии собственного бизнеса. Я до сих пор помню волнение в их голосах когда они говорили о своих идеях.

Была пара, которая с помощью микрокредитов от правительства начала придорожное обслуживание на станции по техническому осблуживанию (СТО), надеявшаяся воспользоваться ростом автотрафика между Астаной и Алматы. Они сказали, что хотели бы понять рынок лучше, чтобы более эффективно вести свой бизнес. Уязвимые к внезапным изменениям на рынке или появлению новых технологий, как частные предприниматели они хотят знать как улучшить производительность и развить свое дело.

Disability and Education: From Charity to Investment

Harry A. Patrinos's picture



Today, on World Autism Day, I’d like to highlight the impact of education on what persons with disabilities are capable of achieving.  More than one billion people – 15% of the world’s population – experience some form of disability. One-fifth of the estimated global total, up to 190 million people, encounter significant disabilities. Persons with disabilities are more likely to experience adverse socio-economic outcomes than persons without disabilities, such as less education, worse health outcomes, less employment, and higher poverty rates.Most persons with disabilities are in developing countries.

50 years of "Returns to Education" studies

Harry A. Patrinos's picture


At last week’s Comparative and International Education Society annual conference in Washington DC, Najeeb Shafiq put together a special panel honoring the work of pioneering education economists Martin Carnoy and George Psacharopoulos (formerly of the World Bank).  Martin and George were supervised by Theodore Schultz, a Nobel Prize winning economist, who made human capital theory an important force- not just in economics- but the social sciences in general.  Their work paved the way for thousands of researchers who followed in their footsteps. 

In Africa, a strong push for capacity, quality and relevance in higher education

Claudia Costin's picture

At the recent Africa Higher Education Summit, I saw encouraging signs that African countries are investing in higher education. But while enrollment is increasing in tertiary education, there is still the need to improve the quality and relevance of programs. Today, Africa needs to urgently build the scientific and technological capacity to add value to its agricultural produce, minerals, oil and gas—as well as to meet urgent development needs.  There is in fact growing demand from African countries for holistic support to education at all levels, starting from early childhood development programs through to higher education, with a focus on equitable access for all.
 
Here are my main takeaways from the summit: 

Aucune fille ne doit être laissée pour compte – L’éducation en Afrique

Claudia Costin's picture
Also available in: English


Pour la Journée internationale de la femme, souvenons-nous des difficultés auxquelles sont confrontées les filles en matière d’éducation

No girl left behind - Education in Africa

Claudia Costin's picture
Also available in: Français


On International Women’s Day, let’s remember the challenges girls face in education.


What would your life be like with only five years of schooling? For many girls around the world, this is the most education they can expect and they are the lucky ones. Across Africa, 28 million girls between the ages of about 6 and 15 are not in school and many will never even set foot in a classroom.

Harriet Nannyonjo on why school leadership should be supported

Anne Elicaño's picture



How did a new training college in Jamaica win a Caribbean-wide award that recognizes the best innovations for solving complex problems? 

Jamaica’s National College for Education Leadership (NCEL) was just established in 2011 but it has already bagged a Bright Spot Award in innovations by the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development. 

Out-of-school children: a promise yet to be fulfilled

Quentin Wodon's picture



Today, as the Millennium Development Goals draw to a close and the development community is thinking of new development targets, many children are not learning in school. But, in addition, more than 120 million children and young adolescents still remain out of school. That is almost one in ten children of primary school age, and one in seven children of lower secondary school age. For these children, the right to education remains a distant dream.

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